who caught and sang the sun in flight

I write a webcomic called The Bright Side, and I like flowers.

wocinsolidarity:

lostthehat:

shuraiya:

beatonna:

lecinematheque:

Pumzi - dir. Wanuri Kahiu // Kenya

In a dystopian future 35 years after an ecological WWIII  has torn the world apart, East African survivors of the devastation remain locked away in contained communities, but a young woman in possession of a germinating seed struggles against the governing council to bring the plant to Earth’s ruined surface.

The main character is a museum curator in the future and also yes I would like see this now please

THERE IS NOTHING ABOUT THIS I DON’T LIKE

The complete short film is on youtube and it’s really good and the end kind of took my breath away. 

GET INTO THIS

(via cursorially)

wildletter:

Wandering Beasts by John Kenn

Kenn writes and directs television shows for children and when he’s not taking care of his own children, he draws monsters on post-it notes. His own “little window into a different work, made on office supplies.” 

(via batcii)

annaglover:

Hey, so over on my bad sketches blog this week I’m doing a daily challenge workshopy type deal based on the elements. Head on over to see and join in too!

annaglover:

Hey, so over on my bad sketches blog this week I’m doing a daily challenge workshopy type deal based on the elements. Head on over to see and join in too!

(via raintalker)

New page of The Bright Side!
a faux pas which he could have easily gotten out of but it would have involved more lying

New page of The Bright Side!

a faux pas which he could have easily gotten out of but it would have involved more lying

rudygodinez:

Oliver Byrne, Eight Page Spreads fromThe First Six Books of the Elements of Euclid”, (1847)

Red, yellow, blue – and of course black – are the colors that Oliver Byrne employs for the figures and diagrams in his most unusual 1847 edition of Euclid, published by William Pickering and printed by Chiswick Press, and which prompt the surprised reader to think of Mondrian. The author makes it clear in his subtitle that this is a didactic measure intended to distinguish his edition from all others: “The Elements of Euclid in which colored diagrams and symbols are used instead of letters for the greater ease of learners.” Byrne is not content to trust solely in the supposed intuitive “logical” structure of Euclid’s axioms and theorems – who doesn’t know the first famous sentences of Euclid’s Elements: "I. A point is that which has no parts. II. A line is length without breadth"? –, but translates them into colorful diagrams and symbols. He thereby thinks in terms of the school classroom: he compares his colors to the dyed chalks in which figures are drawn on the blackboard.

Oliver Byrne was an Irish author and civil engineer. Little is known about his life, though he wrote a considerable number of books. As Surveyor of Her Majesty’s Settlements in the Falkland Islands, Byrne had already published mathematical and engineering works, but never anything like his edition on Euclid. This remarkable example of Victorian printing has been described as one of the oddest and most beautiful books of the 19th century.

Each proposition is set in Caslon italic, with a four-line initial, while the rest of the page is a unique riot of red, yellow and blue. On some pages, letters and numbers only are printed in color, sprinkled over the pages like tiny wild flowers and demanding the most meticulous alignment of the different color plates for printing. Elsewhere, solid squares, triangles and circles are printed in bright colors, expressing a verve not seen again on the pages of a book until the era of Dufy, Matisse and Derain.

(via arzitekt)

lychgate:

fuck i have the largest printmaking boner right now

(via elvendorkling)

the bright side has updated!
characters being kinda inconsistent because they’re upset

the bright side has updated!

characters being kinda inconsistent because they’re upset

Progress (or method, maybe? It’s actually finished there) photos of that drawing I did of the cat claw acacia. I kept cleaning my brush on that rock, I hope that’s not unacceptable to the whole national park thing (this was in the Grand Canyon).

Also I filled up my paintbrush with water from the river and forgot I did that, which means I’ve smuggled water into Australia past customs and probably I wasn’t supposed to. I also accidentally stole a bunch of rocks that I forgot were in my bag. Whoops! They were cool rocks tho.

things i drew in my ideas book that are kind of ok while i was away.

1. some mammalian mermaids. loosely inspired by all the seals and sealions and dolphin-type-things we saw around the channel islands, but mostly just - i care deeply about mammalian mermaids. get yo scales away from me, they’re on the wrong side of my acceptable-biological-improbability line

2. some kelp, as labelled. there were heaps of kelp forests around the channel islands. they were super pretty, even though they kinda freak me out.

3. a character called libby who likes it in america and is i guess into the flag thing

4. my attempt at botanical drawing! it was not very successful! i’m happy with the drawing part but the colouring part was a bit of a flop. lots of improvement to do. watercolouring is hard. it’s a cat claw acacia, i think. i messed up the thorns.

5. a stylised river in a desert, loosely inspired by the colorado before it does the canyon thing

i drew this other thing that i’m sorta happy with and i was gonna attach it too, but it’s tbs related and idk, it’s heavily stylised but people might still figure out the massive spoiler so i left it off. this last bit is more of a note to self, then.